Posts tagged Tony Leung

2046 (Wong, 2004) - Just in case you’re wondering: I HAVE been watching movies. Just a lot fewer than before - but I had an 80s double feature with BF last Thursday (BILL & TED’S BOGUS JOURNEY & ROAD HOUSE), and some others that I’ll post about soon. I’ve been writing, too, just mostly on my old weblog - Justified recaps and a long rambly thing about shipping.

Anyway: 2046. Like Wong Kar-Wai’s other movies, it’s more a poem than prose, with many interlocking strands of narrative which mostly serve as excuses for gorgeous evocative images set to dreamy music. His style actually has a lot in common with the current lo-fi trend in photography, with lots of blurriness and exaggerated color filters (especially in the more sci-fi-y parts), giving everything a gauzy feeling - not inappropriate, of course, for a movie that’s mostly about memory. It’s also male-gazy as hell, with everything filtered through Tony Leung, who’s honestly kind of an ass in the film. A gorgeous ass, sure, but an ass nonetheless. As a consequence, his many leading ladies stay somewhat abstract, beautiful sphinxes, eyes forever brimming with undefined tears. 

Still. I can’t deny that his movies can conjure a melancholy mood like no other.

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CHUNGKING EXPRESS (Wong, 1994) - This was my third Wong Kar-Wai movie, after IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE and MY BLUEBERRY NIGHTS, and I’m still kind of waiting to fall in love. This feels both appropriate (his films being partly about wanting to be in love, about the idea, almost as much as about actually being in love) and strange - what’s not to love, after all? There’s style to burn, a wistful mood, quirky characters, a knowledge of movie iconography: all things I tend to love in movies, but somehow they don’t quite congeal. I like Wong’s movies, but I feel like I’m watching them from a distance. 
I did love the use of Brigitte Lin’s character: the superposition of her film-noir inspired style (raincoat, sunglasses at night) and the garish neon lighting and constant business of Hong Kong is great, and she plays her very artificially, as someone who’s perpetually putting on an act. She’s the most intriguing character in the film, with “us” (the proverbial audience) projecting our ideas and expectations on her just as Qiwu/Cop 223 is.

CHUNGKING EXPRESS (Wong, 1994) - This was my third Wong Kar-Wai movie, after IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE and MY BLUEBERRY NIGHTS, and I’m still kind of waiting to fall in love. This feels both appropriate (his films being partly about wanting to be in love, about the idea, almost as much as about actually being in love) and strange - what’s not to love, after all? There’s style to burn, a wistful mood, quirky characters, a knowledge of movie iconography: all things I tend to love in movies, but somehow they don’t quite congeal. I like Wong’s movies, but I feel like I’m watching them from a distance. 

I did love the use of Brigitte Lin’s character: the superposition of her film-noir inspired style (raincoat, sunglasses at night) and the garish neon lighting and constant business of Hong Kong is great, and she plays her very artificially, as someone who’s perpetually putting on an act. She’s the most intriguing character in the film, with “us” (the proverbial audience) projecting our ideas and expectations on her just as Qiwu/Cop 223 is.

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