MOONRISE KINGDOM (Anderson, 2012) - I’ve been wondering for a while what to say about this movie, except that I was utterly and completely charmed by it. It’s Wes Andersonion to the core, and doesn’t really do anything new besides perhaps offering an unambiguously happy ending for the first time, but does that really matter when a director has a style that’s so idiosyncratic and immediately recognizable? All his movies might be very alike, but there’s no other movies like them out there. I especially appreciate his willingness to use bold colors in this era of omni-present (often teal) filters - this film is very yellow/beige, but it’s production design, not post-production color correction. And it’s rare to find something that is simultaneously so cute (there’s even a kitten) and so frank about how shitty childhood can be. 
Is there nothing to criticize? Oh sure. As usual with Anderson, the movie starts of full of energy and whimsy, but it becomes muddled in the second half. Oddly enough, Tilda Swinton proves to be a worse fit for his sensibility than Bruce Willis and Edward Norton. But when Françoise Hardy starts playing on a portable record player on a beach, and two awkward kids starts dancing to it, you just have to go along with it, and enjoy. 

(Oh, also? Read this)

MOONRISE KINGDOM (Anderson, 2012) - I’ve been wondering for a while what to say about this movie, except that I was utterly and completely charmed by it. It’s Wes Andersonion to the core, and doesn’t really do anything new besides perhaps offering an unambiguously happy ending for the first time, but does that really matter when a director has a style that’s so idiosyncratic and immediately recognizable? All his movies might be very alike, but there’s no other movies like them out there. I especially appreciate his willingness to use bold colors in this era of omni-present (often teal) filters - this film is very yellow/beige, but it’s production design, not post-production color correction. And it’s rare to find something that is simultaneously so cute (there’s even a kitten) and so frank about how shitty childhood can be. 

Is there nothing to criticize? Oh sure. As usual with Anderson, the movie starts of full of energy and whimsy, but it becomes muddled in the second half. Oddly enough, Tilda Swinton proves to be a worse fit for his sensibility than Bruce Willis and Edward Norton. But when Françoise Hardy starts playing on a portable record player on a beach, and two awkward kids starts dancing to it, you just have to go along with it, and enjoy. 

(Oh, also? Read this)

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